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2006 Etchings, Paris
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2006 Etchings, Paris
About the Exhibition/Art Work > 

 

Etchings, Paris 2006
The exhibition took place during:
September 2006 in Paris
April 2007, Tel-Aviv 



The etchings presented here were done in a print workshop at the National Center for Art (la Cité) in Paris in 2006. These miniature etchings are a form which I had never attempted before. I found in this work a special challenge – the possibility to extract from something that is apparently planned and exact –something sensitive, colorful, delicate and a vehicle for expression. It also become clear to me that the nature of working in a small format has its own magic as well as challenges. Suddenly I could express senses, movement and even mood through drawing on miniatures plates.
The etchings in this Gallery are done with by integrating the techniques of etchings, sketching on soft wax, putting the copper in acid, and adding aquatint and dry point.

More about the exhibition

It was only curiosity which led me to undertake etchings. I intended to work in an area which was definitely different from my oil paintings and watercolors on which I had previously worked. I chose to work with miniature etchings precisely because I thought that I could, in the future, integrate them into a group exhibition on miniatures. The etchings presented here were done in a print workshop at the National Center for Art in Paris (La Citè) where I resided for six months in 2006.  Because I had no previous work experience in etchings, I imagined something completely different from the reality which presented itself. Reality demanded, first of all, prior technical work which was not especially fascinating. Suddenly, however, between rigorous filing of one plate or another and hesitant sketching in wax, I saw in this work a special challenge – the possibility to extract something that is apparently planned and exact – that is to say cold and dry by nature, but actually a sensitive, colorful and delicate vehicle for expression. Fortunately, I learned that the work involved in etching, at each level, has a mystery not less than any other technical drawing I had done in the past. Work in etching is similar, to a certain extant, to research.  Like research, one must be careful and alert at every stage, without exception; and like research, premises are postulated which require corroboration, until finally, there are new revelations, not less important. In etching, one begins to work in a certain way, and only after the first printing does one decide on changes—to add aquatint or a change of color. The important thing is that the etching changes until it is beyond recognition and this sudden change is an experience unto itself when the clear, black lines gather patches of color and later the lines themselves transform into color until some of the etchings here appear as if they were drawn in watercolors. The more I progressed in my work; the more the bold lines of the first etchings softened and became more delicate and integrated into the colorful fabric.  Additionally, it became clear to me that the nature of working in this small format has its own magic as well as challenges. Suddenly, I could express senses, movement and even mood through drawing on miniatures plates. The subjects I chose were influenced by the scenery viewed outside my studio window in La Citè, walks on the banks of the Seine, longings for the hills of Jerusalem as well as my own dreams. This small format, in which etchings are made, allows the viewer to gaze at close range at the myriad of mystical details of the miniature.

The etchings in this gallery are done with an integrated technique of etchings (sketching on soft wax, putting the copper in acid, and adding aquatint and dry point.

Liat Polotsky [from the exhibition‘s catalogue]

 

The cover of the catalog

 




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